8 of the Most Unusual Hotels and Hotel Rooms on Earth

8 of the Most Unusual Hotels and Hotel Rooms on Earth

  • 2015-06-26

Travel should never be boring and neither should your accommodations. If you’d like some travel inspiration for your next trip, check out these 8 quirky hotels with features like underwater pizza delivery and spinning rooms that make sure the view never gets old.
 
 
The only underwater hotel in the world located off Florida's coast in the Key Largo Undersea Park, Jules' Undersea Lodge is a teeny hotel that serves up a one-of-a-kind experience. Situated 30 feet below sea level, getting to the hotel is no small feat and requires you to be scuba diving certified, as the entrance to the lodge sits 21 feet below sea level. While the lodge offers only two rooms, guests can stay in the wi-fi equipped rooms “from 3 to 24 hours, or more!”
 
A 3 hour lunch stay with an underwater pizza delivery will run you $150/person. If you're feeling more adventurous, the overnight stay for 2 costs $800 and includes a pizza delivery for dinner, breakfast in the morning, and all the marine life you can watch through the windows in the mangrove lagoon where Jules' is located.
 
 
Though Jules' is sure to face stiff competition from the Poseidon Resort which is also underwater, the resort has yet to open its doors to guests. Despite this, there are an estimated 150,000 visitors already registered for reservations in this undersea haven whose location is yet to be disclosed. Slated to be the world's first seafloor five star resort, the hotel was supposed to open in 2008 but has yet to find a permanent home for its structure. Current prospects point to the hotel's location on a private island in Fiji. The hotel, whose website may fool you into thinking it's actually operational, is said to have 25 suites, a restaurant, bar, gym and a wedding chapel all framed by acrylic glass giving that “life in a fishbowl” feeling for guests lucky enough to afford the $30,000/2 night stay.
 
 
For campers who don't particularly enjoy the “outdoorsiness” of camping, behold, glamping; a luxury form of camping that is more glamourous than camping, and entails some creature comforts. TreeBones Resort offers just this in an array of glamping sites, but perhaps none has captured the imagination of travelers more than the Human Nest. The Human Nest, an “unusual work of woven wood-art was created & built by Big Sur artist Jayson Fann” and offers some of the best views of Big Sur's pacific coastline.
 
The nest itself is made from recycled wood and the resort also offer a pool, hot tub, restrooms, showers, and your own private picnic table adjacent to the nest. Glampers are reminded to bring sleeping bags and pillows, but no need to worry about the rain if you visit between June and November. The Nest costs $150/night and has a 2 night minimum stay.
 
 
A trip to the Arkansas Ozark Mountains might not be complete without a stay at the the Beckham Creek Cave Lodge. Built into the side of the mountains, the unique cave house is just one in a series of spectacular caves in the area. The cave house and its surrounding 500 acres are yours to rent by the day and make for a great group travel destination, featuring 5 bedrooms under cavernous ceilings, an underground Jacuzzi, natural waterfall in the main room, and an impressive recreation room with views overlooking the bluff.
 
Currently undergoing extensive remodeling, the cave house will be available for rent again in the spring of 2015, at which time new rates will be posted. Previous estimates show rooms starting at $400, but prices differ according to the size of the group.
 
 
The concept of capsule hotels originated in Japan in the 1970's, and many of these one-of-a-kind hotels still remain mostly in Japan. The unique feature of the capsule hotels is the rooms themselves, which as you can imagine, resemble capsules in their size and features. From a distance the rooms appear as a series of drawers closely resembling something you would find at your local laundromat, stacked side by side and usually 2 units high. Don't be fooled however, as these tiny rooms typically feature a small TV, wi-fi connection and an electric console to charge your phone or plug your computer into.
 
Hotels feature communal amenities such as washrooms, bathhouses, restaurants, pools, and entertainment options, with rooms divided into male and female floors. For approximately $31/night you can conquer your fear of claustrophobia in what may be the smallest guest rooms in the world.
 
 
Taking the concept of recycling and repurposing to its creative ends, Das Park Hotel features rooms made from large concrete sewage pipe segments. Thoroughly treated before being repurposed, the rooms which are the brainchild of Andreas Strauss first appeared in 2004 in Linz, Austria before being moved to Ottensheim. The rooms are minimalist in their styling and feature the paintings of Austrian artist Thomas Latzel Ochoa to brighten up their insides. Communal showers and restrooms are a stone throws away from the series of concrete pipes. Perched on the Danube River, the concrete tubes are an eco-environmentalist's dream and are available for rent from May to October for under $100/night.
 
 
Aptly named so, Kenya's Giraffe Manor is one of the most sought after accommodation destinations in Kenya. The hotel sits on an estate that is home to a herd of endangered Rothschild Giraffes that are not shy in their interactions with guests. The giraffes, accustomed to the comings and goings of guests, regularly poke their heads into the hotel looking for treats. This is part of what makes Giraffe Manor so unique, “one of the only hotels in the world where you can feed giraffe from your window.”
 
Hotel rooms sit in an old colonial era mansion that can accommodate up to 25 guests. A stay at the manor also allows you access to the “AFEW Giraffe Centre to learn about the endangered Rothschild Giraffe” and a guided walk around the giraffe sanctuary. Rooms begin at $525/a night per person and are all inclusive.
 
 
The world's only spinning hotel is located on the famous Falez cliffs near Antalya, Turkey and guarantees every room has a sea view...at least every 2 to 22 hours; which is how long the hotel takes to complete a full rotation. While the entire hotel complex houses 238 rooms, only the 24 rooms located in the 'Revolving Loft' annex spin throughout the day. This means guests can go to sleep facing the sea and awake with a pool view, all accomplished through an amazing engineering feat that keeps the rooms spinning so smoothly you won't feel a thing.
 
Even if you're not lucky enough to score one of the 24 revolving rooms, there is a communal lounge located on the 3rd floor of the building surrounded by glass on 3 sides. Guests are encouraged to relax and socialize here in a “home away from home” setting. Rooms in the revolving loft run $145/night, with rooms in the rest of the complex starting at $75/night.
 
So, after seeing some of the quirkiest and unique accommodations in the world, where will you stay next?
 
By Kari M.
 
                                                                 
 
Kari is a freelance writer born and raised in Nairobi and currently living in the Midwest. When not mulling too deeply over things, she is making lists out of her lists. You can follow her on Twitter @the_warm_fruit.